Condominium hotels and resorts, advice for investors (Part 2)

Upon arrival the front desk agent greets you in the same friendly manner as they would greet a normal guest, and a key is handed over and you make your way up to your unit.

As you enter you are immediately taken to the dark marks along the wall near the entry  door, luggage marks you guess, the dining table has large scrape marks and one leg is partially broken, there are  glasses and plates missing from the stock you originally purchased, the towels look faded and worn, the carpet hasn’t been vacuumed well, the drapes are not fitted correctly with broken attachments at the top and the bed sheets have hairs on them.

You reflect back to your last monthly statement, which details costs of 50% of revenue to the rental manager, $275 in maintenance and repair costs, the electricity and water bill, your portion of travel agents commission costs and credit card commissions, and the hotel marketing franchise fee, and then you try to figure out how much if any will be left over to pay the mortgage and property taxes. You also note last month was the high season and you couldn’t even stay in your unit so you expected your bottom line income to be one of the best months of the year.

You ask to speak with maintenance about the work not completed in your unit, and get transferred to the rental management company’s in-house maintenance department. A voice mail kindly responds with a message request, which you leave, which is not replied to.

On return from a day enjoying the sights, you decide to speak to the rental management company to complain, firstly about all the revenues which are below expectations, and then all of the repairs and maintenance issues you feel are costs that should be borne by the rental management company as the damage you have seen in the unit has to be renter and guest related and not owner related.

A conversation then occurs that focuses on the definition of what normal wear and tear is, and the owner’s responsibility in covering normal wear and tear costs, but the broken table leg is agreed to be fixed by the management company at their costs. That makes you feel good, until you remember the rental income issue was never discussed. You then make a call to someone else and are reminded that there is a lot of competition and the rental market is not growing as was originally thought, but “we are out performing the competition,” what ever that means. You decide it’s time for a night out to relax and take a meal in the hotel’s restaurant thinking any profit will be reflected in your next monthly statement until you realize on return to your unit that the hotel management company does not share any profit in other areas of the hotel other than income generated through the rental of the units.

Boy, this is getting messy you think, and off back down to the bar for a night cap! (Continued in Part 3!)

 

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